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HAES

Page history last edited by loniemc@... 11 years, 9 months ago

 Studies showing benefits of HAES approach 

 

Bacon, Linda, Judith S. Stern, Marta D. Van Loan, and Nancy L. Keim. “Size Acceptance and Intuitive Eating Improve Health for Obese, Female Chronic Dieters.” Journal of the American Dietetic Association 105 (2005): 929-936.

A study finding that many health indicators can be improved by changes in diet and exercise (Gaesser "Is It Necessary to Be Thin to Be Healthy?"; Bacon).

 

 

The authors found that those-individuals who practiced HAES maintained long-term behavioral changes where the dieting approach did not. Additionally, “reduction in dieting behavior, and heightened awareness and response to body signals resulted in improved health risk indicators for obese women”

 

 

Gaesser, Glenn A. "Is It Necessary to Be Thin to Be Healthy?" Harvard Health Policy Review 4.2 (2003): 40-47.

Research finding that many health indicators can be improved by changes in diet and exercise (Gaesser "Is It Necessary to Be Thin to Be Healthy?"; Bacon).

 

 

Avalos, Laura C. and Tracy L. Tylka “Exploring a Model of Intuitive Eating With College Women.” Journal of Counseling Psychology 53.4 (2006): 486-497.

 

 “General unconditional acceptance predicted body acceptance by others, body acceptance by others predicted and emphasis on body function over appearance, body acceptance by others and an emphasis on body function predicted body appreciation, and an emphasis on body function and body appreciation predicted intuitive eating.” (Avalos and Tylka)

 

 

 

 

Muennig, Peter et al. "[title?]" American Journal of Public Health, March 2008 : as quoted in Reuters Health 2/1/08

http://phoenix.untd.com/TRCK/CLCK//juno.com/startpage/signin/L18/683763060/x45/ISP/ISP_RevolutionHe_CF_1_9838/ISP_RevolutionHe_CF_1_9838212855.html/436f4941495551306e31414141584152?http://www.revolutionhealth.com/news/?id=reut-20080130elin006&msc=A63432  "Feeling Fat may be worse for you than being fat" : "Obesity's health effects could have more to do with feeling bad about being fat than actually being overweight, a new study shows. Researchers who looked at a nationally representative group of more than 170,000 US adults found the difference actual weight and perceived ideal weight was a better indicator of mental and physical health than body mass index (BMI). "The obesity 'epidemic' might have a lot more to do with our collective preoccupation with obesity than obesity itself," the study's lead author, Dr. Peter Muennig of Columbia University in New York City, told Reuters Health. "We still need to focus on healthy diet and exercise as public health officials, but we need to take fatness out of the equation. Were we to stop looking at body fat as a problem, the problem may well disappear."   "

 

 

 

Intuitive Eating Studies (Courtesy of www.intuitiveeating.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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